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Difference between revisions of "Phagocytosis of erythrocytes"

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Appearance:
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'''Appearance''':
  
 
Phagocytosis of red cells by neutrophils opsonised by autoantibody.
 
Phagocytosis of red cells by neutrophils opsonised by autoantibody.
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Images of phagocytosis of erythrocytes by neutrophils
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[[File:Pe1.jpg|leftt|250px|link=]]
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[[File:Pe2.jpg|leftt|250px|link=]]
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'''Images of phagocytosis of erythrocytes by neutrophils:'''
  
 
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Cause:
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'''Cause:'''
 
 
  
 
The autoantibody usually affects children with viral infection, it can also occur idiopathically in adults
 
The autoantibody usually affects children with viral infection, it can also occur idiopathically in adults
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Described by:
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'''Described by:'''
 
 
  
 
Donath and Landsteiner
 
Donath and Landsteiner
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'''Significance:'''
Significance:
 
 
 
  
 
The biphasic IgG autoantibody usually recognises the P antigen binds in cold areas of the body (i.e. the extremities) fixing complement to the red cells. The cells subsequently circulate to warmer areas of the body and undergo complement-mediated hemolysis. This causes intravascular haemolysis anaeamia with haemoglobin in the urine – paroxysmal cold haemoglobinuria (PCH).
 
The biphasic IgG autoantibody usually recognises the P antigen binds in cold areas of the body (i.e. the extremities) fixing complement to the red cells. The cells subsequently circulate to warmer areas of the body and undergo complement-mediated hemolysis. This causes intravascular haemolysis anaeamia with haemoglobin in the urine – paroxysmal cold haemoglobinuria (PCH).
  
 
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Revision as of 19:15, 9 November 2019


Appearance:

Phagocytosis of red cells by neutrophils opsonised by autoantibody.



250px 250px

Images of phagocytosis of erythrocytes by neutrophils:



Cause:

The autoantibody usually affects children with viral infection, it can also occur idiopathically in adults


Described by:

Donath and Landsteiner


Significance:

The biphasic IgG autoantibody usually recognises the P antigen binds in cold areas of the body (i.e. the extremities) fixing complement to the red cells. The cells subsequently circulate to warmer areas of the body and undergo complement-mediated hemolysis. This causes intravascular haemolysis anaeamia with haemoglobin in the urine – paroxysmal cold haemoglobinuria (PCH).