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Difference between revisions of "Gallery: APL"

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'''RECAP''' Hypergranular APL: The number of abnormal cells in blood is usually low in the hypergranular form. The blast cells tend to be large and vary markedly in size. The cytoplasm is densely packed by large granules that may obscure the nuclear appearance. In some cells rod-like structures may occur in bundles (basket cells). APL cells differ from normal promyelocytes since in normal cells the Golgi zone is generally more obvious, and the granules are more uniform and dispersed.
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'''Recap''' Hypergranular APL: The number of abnormal cells in blood is usually low in the hypergranular form. The blast cells tend to be large and vary markedly in size. The cytoplasm is densely packed by large granules that may obscure the nuclear appearance. In some cells rod-like structures may occur in bundles (basket cells). APL cells differ from normal promyelocytes since in normal cells the Golgi zone is generally more obvious, and the granules are more uniform and dispersed.
  
  
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'''RECAP''' Microgranular (hypogranular) APL: The blasts are often more numerous and have a very distinct appearance - most commonly a bi-lobed nucleus where the very soft chromatin makes the appearance almost transparent. There is little or no granulation in most cells, although occasional hypergranular forms may be detected.  
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'''Recap''' Microgranular (hypogranular) APL: The blasts are often more numerous and have a very distinct appearance - most commonly a bi-lobed nucleus where the very soft chromatin makes the appearance almost transparent. There is little or no granulation in most cells, although occasional hypergranular forms may be detected.  
  
 
<gallery widths="180px" heights="180px" >
 
<gallery widths="180px" heights="180px" >
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File:M3v_b.jpg|Hypogranular APL but containing a long Auer rod|link={{filepath:M3v_b.jpg}}
 
File:M3v_b.jpg|Hypogranular APL but containing a long Auer rod|link={{filepath:M3v_b.jpg}}
 
</gallery>
 
</gallery>
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'''Other aspects:'''  
 
'''Other aspects:'''  
  
Look also for features of an associated coagulopathy which is caused by the contents of the abnormal granules and occurs in both forms of APL. In particular look for fragmented red cells and a disproportionate thrombocytopenia.
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Look also for features of an associated coagulopathy, which is caused by release of the abnormal granule contents with a resulting clotting factor activation, and occurs in both forms of APL. In particular look for fragmented or damaged red cells and a disproportionate thrombocytopenia.
  
  
 
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[[File:B-PLL large.jpg|500px|link=]]
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[[File:APL_large.jpg|500px|link=]]
  
  
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[[File:B-PLL large.jpg|500px|link=]]
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[[File:APLv_large.jpg|500px|link=]]
  
  

Revision as of 16:09, 26 March 2020

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Recap Hypergranular APL: The number of abnormal cells in blood is usually low in the hypergranular form. The blast cells tend to be large and vary markedly in size. The cytoplasm is densely packed by large granules that may obscure the nuclear appearance. In some cells rod-like structures may occur in bundles (basket cells). APL cells differ from normal promyelocytes since in normal cells the Golgi zone is generally more obvious, and the granules are more uniform and dispersed.



Recap Microgranular (hypogranular) APL: The blasts are often more numerous and have a very distinct appearance - most commonly a bi-lobed nucleus where the very soft chromatin makes the appearance almost transparent. There is little or no granulation in most cells, although occasional hypergranular forms may be detected.



Other aspects:

Look also for features of an associated coagulopathy, which is caused by release of the abnormal granule contents with a resulting clotting factor activation, and occurs in both forms of APL. In particular look for fragmented or damaged red cells and a disproportionate thrombocytopenia.



APL large.jpg


text


APLv large.jpg


text